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Finding your voice as a photographer, March 9th

Presentation and Critique by National Geographic Photographer Vince Musi

With OPEN CRITIQUE: Bring your work!!



Who you are is more important than what brand of camera you use.
Vincent will reveal how he found his voice as a photographer and provide insight to help you on your path as an image-maker. Allowing his formative experiences to lead rather than limit his photography (interests, dislikes, experiences, background, etc.) has been a 30-year journey for Vince Musi. He says he is the most unlikely guy to be photographing animals for National Geographic, an opportunity that came along when he learned how to stop saying no. Vincent will reveal how he found his voice as a photographer and provide insight to help you on your path as an image-maker.

There will be an OPEN CRITIQUE after the lecture.
You will have the opportunity to receive feedback on your work during an open critique! Critiques are provided on a first come, first serve basis. Please bring a jump drive with up to 5 of your images in a folder labeled with your name. Minimum 2000 pixels on the longest side.



Drinks and snacks will be provided.

When:
Wednesday, March 9th
Social time from 6:30-7pm
Lecture from 7-7:45
Open critique from 8-9:30

Where:
Pro Photo Supply Educational Space
1801 NW Northrup St
Portland, OR 97209

Cost:
Non-members $20
ASMP/OPPA Members $10
Students $5

Musi began as a freelance photographer with the National Geographic Society in 1993, contributing to several book projects and more than a dozen National Geographic magazine articles, including 11 covers. In his 20-plus years shooting for the Magazine, Vince Musi has been the quintessential National Geographic photographer. He's covered classic Geographic-type stories - cultural stories like his assignment to travel America's fabled Route 66, archaeological stories like his work documenting centuries-old crypts in Sicily to an intensely personal portrait of a national wildlife refuge near his home in South Carolina. He has also contributed to Time, Newsweek, Life, Fortune, and the New York Times Magazine.

His work can be seen at: www.vincemusi.com